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US Farm Bill allows for Broader legalization of Hemp and products

What the Bill Reveals

In the Agricultural Act of 2014 (“Farm Bill”) regarding industrial hemp, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and other organizations were given the "green light" to go ahead with pilot programs to allow for hemp to be sold. This led to the adoption by many States of pilot programs to permit growing of the hemp plants in their jurisdictions. This is what provides the lion's share of legal status for hemp and hemp products (such as CBD).

The term “industrial hemp” includes the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part or derivative of such plant, including seeds of such plant, whether growing or not, that is used exclusively for industrial purposes (fiber and seed) with a tetrahydrocannabinols concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis. The term “tetrahydrocannabinols” includes all isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers of tetrahydrocannabinols.

Every five years, Congress passes legislation that sets national agriculture, nutrition, conservation, and forestry policy, commonly referred to as the “Farm Bill”. In this year's version, many amendments (as will happen with our Congress) were added. The one with the real teeth was Mitch McConnell's amendment. This one more openly allows for Hemp legalization (far more than allowed under the 2014 Farm Bill). Although the final passage of this bill has not hit the goal line with the House's version, many are hopeful that it will so it can be signed quickly into law by President Donald Trump.